Air and Space picks Knisley’s “Margaret and the Moon”

Margaret and the Moon cover and a photo of Margaret Hamilton

Margaret and the Moon, written by Dean Robbins and illustrated by Lucy Knisley (’09) was released in May this year, telling the story of one of the women of NASA, Margaret Hamilton. And now Air and Space, a Smithsonian magazine, has listed it among the best aviation- and space-themed children’s books of 2017. “Young readers are sure to be engrossed . . . .”

Page from Margaret and the Moon

Margaret Hamilton originally started working for NASA on the Apollo space mission. Her teams were responsible for developing in-flight software and the systems software, including error detection and recovery software (like restarts). She helped Apollo 11 land on the moon after several computer alarms went of and became the hero of the mission. She also coined the term “software engineering” during these Apollo space missions! (more…)

Graphic Medicine Conference

Page from Mom's Cancer by Brian Fies

The Graphic Medicine Conference has been an annual gathering across North America and the United Kingdom since 2010. And in 2018, the venue is at The Center for Cartoon Studies!

London, 2010, was hosted at the School of Advanced Study, Institute of English Studies, University of London. The keynote speakers were Paul Gravett (editor of The Mammoth Book of Best Crime Comics, 2008), Brian Fies (Mom’s Cancer, 2006), and Marc Zaffran.

Cover of Mom's Cancer by Brian Fies

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Alum Spotlight: Andrew Arnold

Andrew Arnold, Associate Art Director at First Second

Andrew Arnold (’07) is currently an associate art director at First Second.

You’ve been Associate Art Director at First Second for a year now. What has been your favorite book to work on so far?

The Prince and the Dressmaker! Jen Wang’s artwork is beautiful and the story is so tender. It’s an instant classic!

The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang

What has been your favorite moment at First Second?

Attending San Diego Comic Con for the first time! It was all I hoped it would be . . . and more!

What project are you looking forward to most at the moment?

Acquiring my first graphic novel by cartoonist Tim Probert. The project is a middle-grade fantasy adventure that follows the story of two friends trying to save the world. Tim’s artwork is expressive and rich; it’s going to be something special. (more…)

6th Annual Studio Prize

 

The Slate Book Review and The Center for Cartoon Studies are proud to announce the sixth annual Cartoonist Studio Prize!

Each year the Cartoonist Studio Prize is awarded to two cartoonists whose work exemplifies excellence in cartooning. It aspires to celebrate the best work in the medium. Both established creators and new voices are encouraged to submit. (Last year’s winners: Eleanor Davis and Christina Tran.) The creators of two exceptional comics will be awarded $1,000 each. Winners will be selected by Slate’s Jacob Brogan, the faculty and students of The Center for Cartoon Studies (represented by Kevin Czap), and this year’s guest judge: Andrew Farago of San Francisco’s Cartoon Art Museum.

For details, visit:
cartoonstudies.org/studioprize

 

Shark, meet Windows 10

Sharks, meet Windows 10. Pain 3D, meet sharks. Katherine Roy (’10), creator of Neighborhood Sharks (David Macaulay Studio, 2014) and How to Be an Elephant (David Macaulay Studio, 2017), is featured in the current Window’sPaint 3D campaign!

In Paint 3D, you can draw into videos, she Katherine made a super great white shark.

You can see her working on a Windows laptop in Paint 3D and with her references photos: (more…)

Graphic Medicine Conference Call for Papers

Graphic Medicine: The Ways We Work

Graphic Medicine is an annual conference examining and celebrating the role of comics in the study and delivery of healthcare. The next conference will be held at The Center for Cartoon Studies on August 16–19, 2018. They have an open call for papers.

News! The keynote speakers this year are David Macaulay (The Way Things Work) and Susan Merrill Squier (Brill Professor Emerita at Pennsylvania State University).

They are looking for abstracts that focus on health, medicine, and comics (in any form). For example, using comics for clinical interventions, accessing funding sources, engaging with care communities, working with disability injustice, and more. Previous presentations have included “The Process of Comics: Reflection, Identity, Access” lightning talks and “Drawing How the Brain Experiences Trauma” workshop.

There are a few types of presentations. Lightning talks are short, 5-minute presentations introducing a new, ongoing, or completed work. (more…)

Next Up Visiting Artist: Richie Pope

"The Hidden Radicalism of Southern Food" for The New York Times by Richie Pope

“The Hidden Radicalism of Southern Food” for The New York Times by Richie Pope

Richie Pope is an illustrator and cartoonist currently living in Dallas, Texas. Pope has worked with publications such as The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Google, Scientific American, TIME, Nautlius, Tor Books/Tor.com, and The Washington Post. Pope has been recognized by both the Society of Illustrators and Spectrum. (more…)

Alum Em Sauter at Brooklyn Brewery for “Beer is for Everyone!”

Beer is for Everyone signing at Brooklyn Brewery
Beer is for Everyone is out. And if you are in Brooklyn, you can get it signed by the creator, Em Sauter, at Brooklyn Brewery, Friday, December 8, from 7–9. The event is during tasting room hours, so you can sample beer while talking about beer while getting a book about beer signed by a beer-themed cartoonist.
Beer is for Everyone! by Em Sauter
Em will be signing and selling books at a pop up at . As Em says,”The book makes a great gift!” If you need something to talk about with her, check these previous posts:

 

Post by Angela Boyle (’16).

The Center for Cartoon Studies 2017 Appeal

Cover of the 2017 CCS Comic Appeal by Michelle Ollie

Every year, The Center for Cartoon Studies (CCS) sends out its annual comics appeal, drawn by a different artist. Past artists have included Alec Longstreth, Liniers, and Tillie Walden (’16). This year, CCS President and Co-founder Michelle Ollie herself has taken on the task.

Michelle takes us through her poignant and heart-warming childhood story of regaining her confidence and learning to read using comics. This is just one tale of the power of comics as a medium for communication. Click here to read the comic.

It is the time of year again where CCS, a non-profit organization, is reaching out for donations to support their work. They have been pushing more and more cartoonists out into the world, and we want them to continue to do so for decades to come.

You can donate here.

Post by Angela Boyle (’16).

 

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